Stacey Therrien receives Chancellor's Gold U Award for January

by John Keenan, UNMC public relations | March 28, 2013

Stacey Therrien is all about the research.

"I see all the potential that is there, the things that research can really make an impact on," she said. "I love research."

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Stacey Therrien
Therrien's passion is one reason the manager of research for the Department of Anesthesiology is January's recipient of the Chancellor's Gold 'U' award. In the letter nominating Therrien for the award, a group of her colleagues called her "an invaluable resource" in areas such as research projects, grant applications and publications.

"I would say my job is to help faculty succeed in their research endeavors," Therrien said.

One of Therrien's nominators, Shelby Kutty, M.D., praised her dedication and knowledge base about research. Therrien and Dr. Kutty put in about 150 hours in 2011 and 2012 working on grant requests to the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the Edna Ittner Foundation - all of which were funded.

"Stacey is a dynamic person capable of completing challenging tasks with amazing accuracy," Dr. Kutty said. "She goes above and beyond what is asked of her to ensure that deadlines are met and projects have a polished look to them."

Therrien joined UNMC in 2000, and she became a research associate for the cardiology department in 2007.

"Stacey is a champion for medical research and goes out of her way to assist residents and physicians in getting their research grants and papers submitted."

Thomas Porter, M.D.

"During her time in cardiology, she has dedicated herself to the success and future of the clinical and basic science research performed in our department," the nominating letter reads.

Therrien credits Thomas Porter, M.D., with showing her how "basic bench top research" could have practical applications - how, in the end, research helps real people.

"Stacey is a champion for medical research and goes out of her way to assist residents and physicians in getting their research grants and papers submitted," Dr. Porter said. "She has become an expert in the extramural funding process and has been instrumental in getting young new researchers moving forward in their careers."

As for Therrien, she says it's reward enough to be able to help, to see a promising idea become a complete project.

"And you think, 'I was part of that - and it's such beautiful work,' " she said.