UNMC for the record

March 29, 2013

Image with caption: Gleb Haynatzki, Ph. D., a professor in the department of biostatistics, teamed with UNMC accountant Jenelle Pomicter in the College of Public Health's March Madness badminton event.

Gleb Haynatzki, Ph. D., a professor in the department of biostatistics, teamed with UNMC accountant Jenelle Pomicter in the College of Public Health's March Madness badminton event.

Muhammad Zahid, Ph.D., a research assistant professor in the department of environmental, agricultural and occupational health, and Eugene Boilesen, a programmer/analyst in the Center for Collaboration on Research Design and Analysis, took top honors in the College of Public Health Wellness Council's "March Madness: Badminton Style" event on March 21.

A senior nursing student at the UNMC College of Nursing Lincoln Division, Megan Schroeder, participated in a Mayo Clinic program that pairs a nursing student with a clinical coach. As part of the experience, Schroeder authored an article, "First steps into the world of perioperative nursing," that was published in the March 2013 edition of "OR Nurse."

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Tom Tape, M.D.
Tom Tape, M.D., professor, internal medicine, chief of the division of general internal medicine, and vice chair of clinical affairs for internal medicine, has been elected to the Board of Regents of the American College of Physicians (ACP), the national organization of internists. The Board of Regents manages the business and affairs of ACP and is the main policy-making body of the college. Dr. Tape is currently serving as chair of the board of governors for ACP and is chair of the ACP's Health & Public Policy Committee. ACP is the largest medical specialty organization and the second largest physician group in the United States. ACP members include 133,000 internal medicine physicians (internists), related subspecialists, and medical students.

Aimin Peng, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the department of oral biology at the UNMC College of Dentistry has received a R01 grant totaling $1.5 million from the National Institutes of Health. The grant is aimed at investigating a novel molecular mechanism that allows cancer cells to proliferate and cancer to recur following initially successful chemotherapy or radiation therapy. The ultimate goal is to gain a better understanding of how cancer cells develop resistance to treatment and, in so doing, provide the potential to develop more effective cancer therapies. The five-year grant begins April 1.

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